CXI – Council on Extended Intelligence | IEEE-SA & MIT Media Lab

The IEEE Standards Association (IEEE-SA) and the MIT Media Lab are joining forces to launch a global Council on Extended Intelligence (CXI).

CXI was created to proliferate the ideals of responsible participant design, data agency and metrics of economic prosperity prioritizing people and the planet over profit and productivity.

Source: CXI – Council on Extended Intelligence | IEEE-SA & MIT Media Lab

A.I. Needs New Clichés

Our pop culture visions of A.I. are not helping us. In fact, they’re hurting us. They’re decades out of date. And to make matters worse, we keep using the old clichés in order to talk about emerging technologies today. They make it harder for us to understand A.I. — what it is, what it isn’t, and what impact it will have on our lives. When we don’t understand A.I., then we don’t understand the power differentials at play. We won’t learn to ask questions that could lead to better A.I. in the future—and better clichés today. Let’s lay the ghosts and cyborgs to rest and find a real way to communicate about A.I.

Source: A.I. Needs New Clichés – Molly Wright Steenson – Medium

How the Enlightenment Ends – The Atlantic, Henry Kissinger

Philosophically, intellectually—in every way—human society is unprepared for the rise of artificial intelligence.

Ultimately, the term artificial intelligence may be a misnomer. To be sure, these machines can solve complex, seemingly abstract problems that had previously yielded only to human cognition. But what they do uniquely is not thinking as heretofore conceived and experienced. Rather, it is unprecedented memorization and computation. Because of its inherent superiority in these fields, AI is likely to win any game assigned to it. But for our purposes as humans, the games are not only about winning; they are about thinking. By treating a mathematical process as if it were a thought process, and either trying to mimic that process ourselves or merely accepting the results, we are in danger of losing the capacity that has been the essence of human cognition.

Source: How the Enlightenment Ends

AI at Google: our principles

We’re announcing seven principles to guide our work in AI.

– “Be socially beneficial”.
– “Avoid creating or reinforcing unfair bias”.
– “Be built and tested for safety”.
– “Be accountable to people”.
– “Incorporate privacy design principles”.
– “Uphold high standards of scientific excellence”.
– “Be made available for uses that accord with these principles”

Source: AI at Google: our principles

I Tried to Get an AI to Write This Story

The hotness of the moment is machine learning, a subfield of AI.

Even worse, when you look under the rock at all the machine learning, you see a horrible nest of mathematics: Squiggling brackets and functions and matrices scatter. Software FAQs, PDFs, Medium posts all spiral into equations. Do I need to understand the difference between a sigmoid function and tanh? Can’t I just turn a dial somewhere?

It all reminds me of Linux and the web in the 1990s: a sense of wonderful possibility if you could just scale the wall of jargon. And of course it’s worth learning, because it works.

Source: I Tried to Get an AI to Write This Story

Duplex shows Google failing at ethical and creative AI design

But while the home crowd cheered enthusiastically at how capable Google had seemingly made its prototype robot caller — with Pichai going on to sketch a grand vision of the AI saving people and businesses time — the episode is worryingly suggestive of a company that views ethics as an after-the-fact consideration.

One it does not allow to trouble the trajectory of its engineering ingenuity.

Source: Duplex shows Google failing at ethical and creative AI design

Google’s AI sounds like a human on the phone — should we be worried?

…if this technology becomes widespread, it will have other, more subtle effects, the type which can’t be legislated against. Writing for The Atlantic, Alexis Madrigal suggests that small talk — either during phone calls or conversations on the street — has an intangible social value. He quotes urbanist Jane Jacobs, who says “casual, public contact at a local level” creates a “web of public respect and trust.” What do we lose if we give people another option to avoid social interactions, no matter how minor?

Source: Google’s AI sounds like a human on the phone — should we be worried?

Awful AI is a curated list to track current scary usages of AI – hoping to raise awareness

Awful AI is a curated list to track current scary usages of AI – hoping to raise awareness to its misuses in society

Artificial intelligence in its current state is unfair and easily susceptible to attacks. Nevertheless, more and more concerning uses of AI technology are appearing in the wild. This list aims to track all of them. We hope that Awful AI can be a platform to spur discussion for the development of possible contestational technology (to fight back!).

Source: GitHub – daviddao/awful-ai: Awful AI is a curated list to track current scary usages of AI – hoping to raise awareness

UK can lead the way on ethical AI, says Lords Committee – News from Parliament

The UK is in a strong position to be a world leader in the development of artificial intelligence (AI). This position, coupled with the wider adoption of AI, could deliver a major boost to the economy for years to come. The best way to do this is to put ethics at the centre of AI’s development and use concludes a report by the House of Lords Select Committee on Artificial Intelligence, AI in the UK: ready, willing and able?, published today.

Source: UK can lead the way on ethical AI, says Lords Committee – News from Parliament